Compliance

Kensa Heat Pumps manufacture ground source heat pumps in accordance with a number of standards and industry accreditations, for compliance with key building regulations.

Carbon compliance

A ground source heat pump can reduce CO2 emissions by typically 37% over gas and 55% over oil.

Part L now states that the annual CO2 emission rate or Dwelling Emission Rate (DER) of a completed building must not exceed a Target Emission Rate (TER) set by reference to a notional building of the same size and shape.

By selecting a ground source heat pump to provide a building’s heating requirement the DER/BER of the building is reduced and hence the building is more likely to pass building regulations on the CO2 emission requirements. By utilising the energy in the ground, a ground source heat pump can produce over twice the amount of energy for the same amount of initial energy input as a gas fired boiler. This means that the CO2 emissions will be lower for a ground source heat pump than other non-renewable fuels.

COP & MCS

COP & emissions

The Coefficient of Performance (COP) demonstrates the efficiency of a technology.

Although a ground source heat pump uses electricity (which has the largest emission rate), as it can operate with a COP of 4, i.e. for every one kW of electrical energy used it produces 4 kW of thermal heat, the actual CO2 emission rate for providing heat to a building is 0.113kg CO2/kWh.

This shows a reduction in CO2 emissions of  typically 37% over gas and 55% over oil.

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MCS

The majority of Kensa ground source heat pumps are MCS accredited, and tested using Kensa’s own MCS accredited test rig at our ISO9001 manufacturing plant.

MCS accreditation is a requirement for all applications to the Domestic RHI, and applications below 45kWth in the non-Domestic RHI.

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ErP & Part L

Energy-related Products (ErP)

ErP stands for ‘Energy-related products”. Since 2015 under EU regulations ground source heat pumps (as well as air source heat pumps, boilers and water heaters) are required by law to have labels to show their energy performance as an individual product and when part of an overall heating system.

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Part L

The energy efficiency and CO2 performance of Kensa ground source heat pumps enable developers to easily conform with Part L (Conservation of Fuel and Power) of the Building Regulations.

Part L (Part J in Scotland) now states that the annual CO2 emission rate or Dwelling Emission Rate (DER) of the completed building must not exceed a Target Emission Rate (TER). By using a ground source heat pump to provide a building’s heating requirement the DER/BER of the building is reduced and hence the building is more likely to pass building regulations on the CO2 emission requirements.

 

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Sustainable Homes

Planning

Ground Source Heat Pumps have Permitted Development Rights (PDR) which means they can be installed without the need to seek planning permissions.

Decent Homes

Ground source heat pumps help social housing providers achieve Decent Homes Standards through carbon, cost and energy savings.

Code for Sustainable Homes

Due to the lower CO2 emissions from a Kensa heat pump it can help meet the minimum percentage reduction in Dwelling Emission Rate Over Target Emission Rate (as per SAP 2005), achieving a level 3 and upwards of the Code for Sustainable Homes. The Code provides valuable information to home buyers, and offers builders and architects a tool with which to differentiate themselves in sustainability terms.

Level 3 of the Code, represents a 25% improvement on Part L, and must be achieved to attract Housing corporation funding with level four (44% improvement) increasingly becoming the target

ISO9001 & RECC

ISO9001

The world’s most recognized quality management standard. It is the established policy of Kensa Heat Pumps to:

  • Satisfy our customers needs and expectations;
  • Make commitments we fully understand and believe we can meet;
  • Meet all these commitments to customers on time.

To enable this, we have implemented a management system, based on, but not limited to, the requirements of BS EN ISO 9001 : 2008.

Renewable Energy Consumer Code (RECC)

The aim of the Renewable Energy Consumer Code is to ensure that consumers wishing to install a small-scale heat or power generation unit for their homes have the necessary confidence and service standards so that they can make an informed choice.

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SAP & Merton Rule

Merton Rule

Many local authorities have adopted the use of the ‘Merton Rule’ within their planning requirements. Pioneered by the London Borough of Merton, the Merton Rule requires the use of renewable energy onsite to reduce annual CO2 emissions in the built environment. Typical reductions are 10%, however a number of authorities have increased above this level and are planning to introduce more stringent targets.

Due to their high efficiencies installing a ground source heat pump will reduce CO2 emissions and help meet the building’s 10% (or greater) renewable obligation.

SAP & SBEM

Standard Assessment Procedure(SAP) is the Government’s standard methodology for assessing the energy consumption in new domestic dwellings.

Simplified Building Energy Model (SBEM) is used to calculate the energy consumption for commercial projects.

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Passivhaus & BREEAM

Passivhaus

The Kensa Shoebox heat pump is ideal for passivhaus developments due to its low heat and aural outputs and high efficiencies.

BREEAM

Kensa ground source heat pumps conform to the demands of the world’s leading design and assessment method for sustainable buildings, BREEAM.